March 2016 - Upcoming Events

Date Event
Type
Title Campus Building
1/5 - 3/16 Exhibit Artists of Excellence ~ Reenganche ~ Sculptures by Martin Dominguez Ball NBG Kaplan Hall, foyer of Mindy Ross Gallery
2/8 - 3/24 Exhibit North East Watercolor Society Members' 2016 Show MDTN Orange Hall Gallery
2/8 - 3/24 Exhibit Watermarks ~ Watercolors by Pat Morgan MDTN Orange Hall Gallery Fringe
3/2,
7:30 p.m.
Lecture The Human Footprint now on the Galápagos Islands MDTN Rowley Center for Science & Engineering, Gerry Forum
3/8 - 5/10 Exhibit Well Planned Improvisations ~ Works by John F. Simon, Jr. NBG Kaplan Hall,
Mindy Ross Gallery
3/10,
7 p.m.
Lecture and Film The Irish MDTN Middletown Library, Gilman Center
3/13,
3 p.m.
Concert Elegant Versatility: Pianoforte MDTN Orange Hall Theatre
3/14,
7 p.m.
Lecture “Think Globally, Act Locally”: How NASA’s Apollo Program Launched the Environmental Movement MDTN Middletown Library, Gilman Center
3/15,
11 a.m.
Theatre Woman Banned NBG Kaplan Hall, OCTC Great Room
3/29 - 6/15 Exhibit Artists of Excellence ~ What Wood You Make? NBG Kaplan Hall, foyer of Mindy Ross Gallery
3/29,
7 p.m.
Class The Joy of Wood-turning NBG Kaplan Hall, OCTC Great Room
3/31,
11 a.m.
Lecture Are LGBTs the worst Homophobes of all? MDTN Middletown Library, Gilman Center

Artists of Excellence ~ Reenganche ~ Sculptures by Martin Dominguez Ball

Tuesday, January 5, 2016 to Wednesday, March 16, 2016
The Foyer of the Mindy Ross Gallery, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

Martin Dominguez Ball, artist and professorMartin Dominguez Ball, a native of Uruguay and a resident of Warwick, is the featured sculptor to start off the 2016 Artist of Excellence series. Titled Reenganche, meaning to reconnect and come back into play, the exhibit, which is on display January 5 through March 16, is comprised of sculptures made of found wood and metal. The works range in size from large to small, with “Don Quijote,” a representational piece, the largest at 42 by 59 inches while “Key to My Heart,” an abstract work, is one of the smallest at 12 by 4 inches.

Don Quijote, wood by Martin Dominguez BallThe Artist of Excellence series was initiated to spotlight highly talented regional artists. Artworks are on view in the glass vitrine cases located in the Foyer of the Mindy Ross Gallery, Kaplan Hall, SUNY Orange. It is a wonderful setting afforded with natural light and multi-directional viewing of the pieces. Visitors may see the exhibit during regular college hours, Monday through Friday 8am to 4pm January 5 through 15, and Monday through Thursday 8am to 8pm and Friday 8am to 4:30pm from January 19 onward, and additionally, on Saturdays, January 30 and February 27 from 4 to 7pm.

Key to My Heart, wood and metal by Martin Dominguez BallOn January 30 from 4 to 7pm, the Mindy Ross Gallery and Foyer will be open for Last Saturdays #NBLS, a Newburgh arts initiative. An artist’s talk, A Creative Process by Martin Dominguez Ball, will begin at 5:30pm. Dominguez Ball will explain how he “approaches every art or design project as an opportunity to challenge myself as an artist and as a human being.” During the talk he will also discuss his concept of his art as “not seeking acceptance but a willingness to converse.” The college community and community-at-large are invited to meet the artist and ask questions while enjoying refreshments. This event and the exhibit are free and open to the public.

Martin Dominguez Ball is a visual artist, graphic designer, sculptor, filmmaker, and musician.  He holds an AAS in visual communications from SUNY Orange, a BFA in graphic design from St. John’s University, and an MFA in interdisciplinary arts from Goddard College, Vermont. His paintings, drawings, and sculptures have been well received in galleries in New York City and the New York metropolitan area. In addition to his work in filmmaking and graphic designing, he teaches fine arts and graphic design at SUNY Orange and St. John’s University.

Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets where free, secure parking is available via the garage entered at 73 First Street, Newburgh. Questions about the exhibit and artist’s talk may be directed to Cultural Affairs: (845)341-4891/9386 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Martin Dominguez Ball, artist and professor; Don Quijote, wood by Martin Dominguez Ball; Key to My Heart, wood and metal by Martin Dominguez Ball

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North East Watercolor Society Members' 2016 Show

Monday, February 8, 2016 to Thursday, March 24, 2016
Orange Hall Gallery and Loft (MDTN)

Winter has finally settled in with its cold temperatures and various shades of gray, tan, white, but Orange Hall Gallery and Loft are array in the colors of all the seasons with the arrival of the North East Watercolor Society 2016 Members’ Amsterdam Tangle, watercolor by Sharon Way-HowardShow. One hundred ten paintings by sixty artists are on display February 8 through March 24, 2016. Varying in size from small to large, in styles ranging from loose brushstrokes to exact illustrative details, the land, sea and, city scapes, portraits, genre paintings, still lifes, and semi-abstracts celebrate the watercolor medium.

Spring Eggs, watercolor by Lana PriviteraThe reception at which awards will be presented will take place on Sunday, March 6 from 1 to 4:15pm. Pianist Geoff Hamburg will start off the afternoon event at 1pm by playing jazz and classical standards.

Then, at 2:30pm, award-winning watercolorist and exhibit judge, Pat Morgan, will give an hour long demonstration, Capturing Gesture and Movement, during which she will explain her technique and use of colors as she paints and also references the paintings in her solo show, Watermarks, on the wall of Orange Hall Gallery Fringe.

Berger Australien, watercolor by Kristin RanneyAward winners will be announced at the end of the reception. Both the reception and exhibits are free and open to the public.

Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 9am-8pm, Friday 9am-6pm.  The gallery is also open Friday, February 19 ~ 9am-9:45pm and Sundays, February 28 and March 13 ~ 2-5pm.

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, (GPS: 24 Grandview Ave.) on the Middletown campus of SUNY Orange. Questions may be addressed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Amsterdam Tangle, watercolor by Sharon Way-Howard; Spring Eggs, watercolor by Lana Privitera; Berger Australien, watercolor by Kristin Ranney

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Watermarks ~ Watercolors by Pat Morgan

Monday, February 8, 2016 to Thursday, March 24, 2016
Orange Hall Gallery Fringe (MDTN)

Pat Morgan, artist“I was meant to do this,” states Pat Morgan about her fascination in painting with watercolors. She didn’t take up painting until after her retirement. Once she experimented with brush, paints, and water, “It was love at first stroke,” she recalls.

Morgan has become an avid painter as she creates artworks that depict the beauty in ordinary moments, through broad, loose strokes of color. From February 8 through March 24, 2016, a varied selection of her works is on display on the large wall of Orange Hall Gallery Fringe in her solo show Watermarks ~ Watercolors by Pat Morgan.

Big Apple Lunch, watercolor by Pat MorganMorgan is a signature member of the North East Watercolor Society, the New Jersey Water Color Society, the Garden State Watercolor Society, and a former elected member of the Salmagundi Club in NYC. An award-winning artist in her own right having received several local and regional awards, this year she is the judge of the 110 paintings entered in the North East Watercolor Society Members’ Exhibit.

Girl Talk, watercolor by Pat MorganDuring the dual reception on Sunday, March 6 from 1-4:15pm for her show and the NEWS exhibit, she is presenting a demonstration on working in this fast medium. Capturing Gesture and Movement will begin at 2:30pm in the gallery. Some of her watercolors are also included in four books of poetry by her husband Richard, I Am Sea Glass, Sea Glass People, Sea Glass Soul, and Hebrew Lessons, which will be on display during the reception. The reception and exhibits are free and open to the public.

While sharing her love of watercolors, her generous spirit has led her to promise that the sale of any works, including the books at the reception, will directly benefit a disabled veteran and/or his/her family in Orange County.

Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 9am-8pm, Friday 9am-6pm. The gallery is also open Friday, February 19 ~ 9am-9:45pm and Sundays, February 28 and March 13 ~ 2-5pm.

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, (GPS: 24 Grandview Ave.) on the Middletown campus of SUNY Orange. Questions may be addressed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Pat Morgan, artist; Big Apple Lunch, watercolor by Pat Morgan; Girl Talk, watercolor by Pat Morgan

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The Human Footprint now on the Galápagos Islands

Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 7:30pm
Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, Room 010, Rowley Center for Science & Engineering (MDTN)

Warren Allmon, the Director of the Paleontological Research Institution and the Museum of the Earth, with Galápagos Giant TortoiseWhat has happened to the Galápagos Islands?

They have been invaded by humans! They were first “discovered” in 1535 but for a long time they were ignored until the government of Ecuador, the country to which the islands are closest, began settling them in the 1800s. Subsequent to that decision, over the course of 200+ years, with the advent of humans and their accompanying pets, other animals, and plants, drastic happenings occurred: the delicate ecological balance was shattered. Habitats were ruined and food supplies for native species diminished. From occasional ecologists, other scientists, historians, and prisoners of the penal colony to multitudes of tourists, the once unknown place has now become a destination vacation.

Two Male Marine Iguanas in Breeding Colors Battling for TerritoryOn Wednesday, March 2, 2016, Dr. Warren Allmon will speak on The Human Footprint now on the Galápagos Islands. The lecture begins at 7:30pm at the Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum of the Rowley Center for Science and Engineering (RCSE), Room 010 at SUNY Orange.

The Galápagos Islands are an archipelago located about 621 miles (1,000 km) from the continent of South America in the eastern part of the Pacific Ocean. The archipelago is composed of 19 volcanic islands-- the main islands, and 120 small islands according to UNESCO.

When Charles Darwin made his famous visit to the Galápagos Islands while on the voyage of the HMS Beagle, he found endemic (native only to the islands) wildlife. Because the islands were seemingly untouched for thousands of years, animals changed to fit their environment and adapt to any existing “vacancy” in that particular ecological zone. Darwin’s visit to the islands inspired his theory of natural selection and drove his writing of On the Origin of Species which was published in 1859.

Boobie Watching Visitor“One of the most remote and unspoiled spots on Earth nevertheless is home to more than 30,000 permanent residents, and is visited by more than 200,000 tourists each year. What does the future hold for ‘Darwin’s lost world’?” asks Allmon.

Warren D. Allmon has been a visiting lecturer who has spoken at SUNY Orange on a variety of subjects during the last decade. He is a very engaging speaker, and welcomes discussion. Allmon is the Director of the Paleontological Research Institution and the Museum of the Earth. In addition, he is the Hunter R. Rawlings, III Professor of Paleontology of the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University. He holds an A.B. in Earth Sciences from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Harvard University.

The event is free and open to the public. RCSE is on Wawayanda Avenue, Middletown, and accessed through the parking lot across East Conkling Avenue from the parking garage where free parking is available.

Questions may be directed to (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Warren Allmon, the Director of the Paleontological Research Institution and the Museum of the Earth, with Galápagos Giant Tortoise; Two Male Marine Iguanas in Breeding Colors Battling for Territory; Boobie Watching Visitor

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Well Planned Improvisations ~ Works by John F. Simon, Jr.

Tuesday, March 8, 2016 to Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Mindy Ross Gallery, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

A highly modern and creative solo exhibit by John F. Simon, Jr., Well Planned Improvisations, is on display in the Mindy Ross Gallery from March 8 - May 10, 2016.  The gallery is located in Kaplan Hall at SUNY Orange.  

Morada II (Earth), 2008, 30 x 36 x 6”, custom software, Apple Mini Computer, LCD screen, lacquered wood, paint, and laser cut formica by John F. Simon, JrHis eclectic body of work from 2008 to the present includes Software Art, CAD/CAM paintings, and non-digital drawings.  Every day, Simon creates a drawing using pencil, watercolor, or gouache.  His creative process for these drawings is intuitive and improvisational.  From these, he finds source material that inspires his larger works that he creates with technological means.  His Morada and Pendulum pieces from the Color and Time series continually iterate compositional and color space variations driven by custom written software.  In the larger machine carved works, such as RiverCycle, digital methods are employed with a CNC router that cuts and engraves the wood before it is painted and covered in formica.  Simon likes to finish larger pieces by returning to the practice of drawing lines by hand directly on the surface.  With non-digital and technological processes blending together, he explores a relevant dichotomy in the contemporary world.

RiverCycle, 2010, 45 ½ x 44 x ¾”, Trupan Ultralight, Plastic laminate (Abet & Formica), Flashe paint by John F. Simon, JrJohn F. Simon, Jr. is one of the pioneers in the development of Software Art and since the mid-1980s, is renowned in this area for articulating the use of code in digital and multimedia works. An integral person in the early community of artists and curators who created the first wave of software applications, web-based projects, and digital approaches to art making, he with his colleagues paved the way for the continuance of expanding in new directions every year.  In 2011, Simon collaborated with Icelandic singer Björk to write an app for her album, Biophilia, the first app album ever created.

Simon holds a BA in Art (Studio) and a BS in Geology from Brown University. He continued on to study Earth and Planetary Sciences and receive an MA at Washington University, St. Louis, MO. Then turning his attention to art, he earned an MFA in Computer Art at the School of Visual Arts in NYC.  He subsequently taught at SVA until 1993 when he began his full-time studio practice.

Red Pendulum, 2008, 30 x 36 x 6”, custom software, Apple Mini Computer, LCD screen, lacquered wood, paint, and laser cut formica by John F. Simon, Jr.His artworks can be found in the permanent collections of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The Museum of Modern Art in New York, Collezione Maramotti, The Brooklyn Museum, The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and The Whitney Museum of American Art where his seminal work "Every Icon" was included in the 2000 Biennial.

In cooperation with Newburgh Last Saturdays #NBLS, a reception will be held on April 30 from 4 - 7pm.  At 5:30pm, Donna Spector will read from her new books, Lessons, a chapbook of poems, and Two Worlds, a full-length collection of recent work.

Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 9am - 5pm.  The gallery is also open on Sunday, April 10 from 2:30 - 5pm and on Mondays, April 4 and 18 until 8:30pm and April 11 until 9pm.  In the gallery on Tuesday, April 26 at 12:15pm, Simon will give a master class titled, Boundary Conditions: Drawing in a Digital World.  The exhibit, reception, and master class are free and open to the public.

Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh, NY. Free and secure parking is available in the Kaplan Hall garage accessible at 73 First Street.

Questions may be addressed to Cultural Affairs at cultural@sunyorange.edu or 845-341-4891/9386.

Images, top to bottom: Morada II (Earth), 2008, 30 x 36 x 6”, custom software, Apple Mini Computer, LCD screen, lacquered wood, paint, and laser cut formica by John F. Simon, Jr.; RiverCycle, 2010, 45 ½ x 44 x ¾”, Trupan Ultralight, Plastic laminate (Abet & Formica), Flashe paint by John F. Simon, Jr.; Red Pendulum, 2008, 30 x 36 x 6”, custom software, Apple Mini Computer, LCD screen, lacquered wood, paint, and laser cut formica by John F. Simon, Jr.

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The Irish

Thursday, March 10, 2016 at 7pm
Gilman Center, Library Room 130 (MDTN)

Jeffrey S. Dosik, librarian and historian of Bob Hope Memorial LibraryThe topic of immigration is today one of controversy. So, it was, too, when throngs of immigrants entered the USA in the mid-19th through mid-20th centuries, reshaping the nation. A view of this massive immigration through the perspective of one ethnic group will be provided in a lecture with film presentation, entitled The Irish. This event will take place on Thursday, March 10, 2016 beginning at 7pm in the Gilman Center for International Education located in the Library at SUNY Orange. The featured speaker is Jeffrey S. Dosik of Newburgh.

Irish Immigrant Women waiting to be inspected on Ellis Island early 1900’sWith the expertise of the subject that he has gained in his 28 years as librarian and historian in charge of Bob Hope Memorial Library, the research library on Ellis Island, he assists National Park Service staff and people in the private sector in researching the Statue of Liberty and United States Immigration history and law with a focus on Ellis Island 1892-1954.

From 1846 to 1851, more than a million people fled Ireland for the United States due mostly to crop failure caused by fungus which in turn, led to the Irish Potato Famine; 650,000 came to New York. Others filled up American port cities from the northeast, Boston and Philadelphia, to southern ports such as Savannah and New Orleans. During the period of 1892 to 1954, 3,501,683 Irish arrived in the United States.

Irish Immigrant Family in front of their Sod House, South Dakota, 1882The small island in Upper New York Bay that was enlarged from 3.3 acres to over six acres in 1890 and then expanded to 27.5 acres through landfill, was the port of entry for over 12 million immigrants from 1892 to 1954. This was Ellis Island and it became synonymous with immigration. The island was declared part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument in 1965 and after extensive renovations reopened as a museum in September 1990.  

Dosik enjoys sharing his knowledge and welcomes questions. Join him for this session, which is free and open to the public, and given as a service of the National Park Service Community Outreach Program. He holds a BA in Political Science from SUNY Oneonta and an MA in Political Science from New School for Social Research. His articles on various historical subjects, but all centered on the theme of Liberty, have been published in The Statue of Liberty Club Newsletter.

SUNY Orange’s Library is situated at the corner of South Street and East Conkling Avenue (near GPS 115 South Street), Middletown. Free parking is available in the college’s parking garage on East Conkling Avenue or the parking lots in back of the Shepard Center across South Street from the Library.

Questions may be directed to (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Jeffrey S. Dosik, librarian and historian of Bob Hope Memorial Library; (the following photos with permission and from Bob Hope Memorial Library) Irish Immigrant Women waiting to be inspected on Ellis Island early 1900’s; Irish Immigrant Family in front of their Sod House, South Dakota, 1882

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Elegant Versatility: Pianoforte

Sunday, March 13, 2016 at 3pm
Orange Hall Theatre (MDTN)

Award-winning Russian pianist Ilya Yakushev is returning to Middletown to give a recital of four beloved pieces in classical repertoire. Orange Hall Theatre is the venue for Elegant Versatility: Pianoforte scheduled to begin at 3pm on Sunday, March 13, 2016. Orange Hall is located on the SUNY Orange campus at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, (GPS: 24 Grandview Ave.) Middletown, NY. He previously played at the college in 2004, 2006, and 2012.

Ilya Yakushev, pianistThe selections by Beethoven, Gershwin, Rachmaninoff, and Paganini are each individually audience pleasers. However, they were chosen to demonstrate the versatility of the piano. Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13, Pathetique was written for solo piano. It is Yakushev’s favorite Beethoven sonata. Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue was originally composed for solo piano and jazz band and then orchestrated by Ferde Grofé. It became so popular that Gershwin, himself, made versions of the piece for solo piano as well as two pianos. Rachmaninoff’s Sonata for cello & piano in G minor, Op. 19 is a piano duo. And, Paganini’s Variations on One String on a Theme by Rossini for Cello and Piano places the piano in the role of accompanist.

Thomas Mesa, cellistThe important seat of cellist for the Rachmaninoff and Paganini pieces is being filled by Thomas Mesa, Yakushev’s friend. They are both members of the St. Petersburg (Russia) Piano Quartet. Young, yet quite accomplished, Mesa recently won the coveted 2016 Sphinx Award. Along with receiving a BM from The Juilliard School and an MM from Northwestern University, he is a DMA candidate at Manhattan School of Music. He is a regular recitalist in New York City, Chicago, and Miami. In addition, as a performing artist, he has toured with Itzhak Perlman. He particularly likes the Paganini Variations because the piece features “the A string with its fiery quality and natural projection.”

“Yakushev, whose playing shares a spiritual quality with his mentor, Vladimir Feltsman, alternates power with a silken touch” states Life@ReadingEagle.com in a recent review. Since age 12, he has been a prize-winner at international competitions. In addition to being a soloist and chamber music player, Yakushev has collaborated with orchestras in the US, Canada, UK, and Russia, and occasionally works with the Accordion Virtuosi of Russia. He holds BM and MM degrees from Mannes College of Music. He has recorded all of Prokofiev’s sonatas. 

Tickets for this exciting concert are available online anytime at www.sunyorange.edu/arts_comm/ticketing.shtml and at the box office starting at 2pm the day of the performance at $15 adults; $10 senior citizens, faculty, staff, alumni; free—all students. Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845) 341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu

Images, top to bottom: Ilya Yakushev, pianist; Thomas Mesa, cellist

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“Think Globally, Act Locally”: How NASA’s Apollo Program Launched the Environmental Movement

Monday, March 14, 2016 at 7pm
Gilman Center, Library Room 130 (MDTN)

The concept of a ‘picture is worth a thousand words’ certainly was true in the iconic image of the ‘Whole Earth,’ the blue and white photograph of the Earth from outer space taken by the crew of Apollo 17. That visual of Planet Earth enveloped in clouds as an all intact unit helped give rise to the modern environmental movement.  At 7pm on Monday, March 14, 2016, Dr. Neil Maher will present a program which explains how the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s space technology produced data that enabled environmental scientists to track global ecological changes in the atmosphere, under the sea, and on land.  In his lecture, “Think Globally, Act Locally”: How NASA’s Apollo Program Launched the Environmental Movement, Maher looks at the movement from the scientific as well as historical perspectives.

Neil Maher, PhD, associate professor of history in the Federated History Department at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University in NewarkThe venue for the presentation is the Gilman Center for International Education at SUNY Orange, located within the Library in room 130. This event is free and open to the public. Q & A will offer attendees time to discuss this subject with Maher.

NASA’s Earth-orbiting satellites allowed environmental scientists to identify the ozone hole above the Antarctic, map deforestation across the Amazon, and measure slight temperature increases throughout the world that supported early theories regarding global warming. During the evening program, Maher will show film footage from space taken by Apollo astronauts and video recordings of NASA scientists, both of which sparked the modern environmental movement while shaping scientific understanding of the current climate change crisis.

Earth as viewed by Apollo 17, photograph courtesy of NASANeil M. Maher is an associate professor of history in the Federated History Department at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University in Newark.  During academic year 2013-2014, he was a Fellow at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University. In 2009, Maher received the Robert W. Van Houten Award for Teaching Excellence from the NJIT. He holds a BA in History from Dartmouth College and a PhD in History from NYU. He has published articles in academic journals including the Hudson River Valley Review, Environmental History, and the Chronicle of Higher Education, as well as on-line publications and blogs the History News Network and The Edge of the American West. He has one book to his credit, Nature’s New Deal: The Civilian Conservation Corps and the Roots of the American Environmental Movement, and a new book covering more fully the topic of this lecture.

The Library is situated at the corner of South Street and East Conkling Avenue (near GPS 115 South Street), Middletown. Free parking is available in the college’s parking garage on East Conkling Avenue or the parking lots in back of the Shepard Center across South Street from the Library.

Questions may be directed to (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu

Images, top to bottom: Neil Maher, PhD, associate professor of history in the Federated History Department at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University in Newark; Earth as viewed by Apollo 17, photograph courtesy of NASA

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Woman Banned

Tuesday, March 15, 2016 from 11am to noon
Orange County Trust Company Great Room, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

During the common hour of 11am to noon on Tuesday, March 15, 2016, an issue of grave importance will be brought to center stage in the Orange County Trust Company Great Room in Kaplan Hall. A multimedia presentation by Nancy Hulse --Woman Banned: a spoken word performance dealing with rape, relationship violence, mental illness, and addiction--focuses on violence against women.  The 45-minute presentation will be followed by a talkback with the performer.  This event is free and open to the public.

Woman BannedThis new life is daunting with no clear direction.
Strong women are seen as less than perfection.
There is no book of rules for women like me. 
Who stand up and say I want to be free.
--Nancy Hulse

Hulse has been giving anti-rape programs across the nation for over twenty years, mostly on university Nancy Hulsecampuses. She characterizes this new work as a unique approach using “educational material” through the medium of performance art, poetry, dialogue, while intertwining her own personal experiences.  “Educational institutions in particular have found my performances to be a very effective device to introduce students to these difficult and emotional subjects,” states Hulse. “The dynamic nature of the presentation promotes a lively discussion that often lasts long after the show has ended.” She explains that her “primary goal is to tell the truth about rape,” and adds, “I believe women need to unite against the crime and men need to take responsibility and act against it. It's not the woman’s fault, no matter what she does and what she wears,” she asserts.

Amy Bellina, Director of Student Development at Monmouth University, describes the work as “...unique, timely, thought-provoking.” And Kathleen Holgerson, Associate Director of the Women’s Center at the University of Connecticut, adds, “the performance is a powerful and innovative way of raising awareness...articulate and inspiring.”  

Nancy HulseCome, listen, learn, and participate.

Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh.  Free and secure parking is available in the Kaplan Hall garage accessible at 73 First Street. For more information, send an email to cultural@sunyorange.edu or call (845)341-9386.

According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence:

  • Every 9 seconds in the USA, a woman is assaulted or beaten.
  • On average, nearly 20 people per minute are physically abused by an intimate partner in the USA. During one year, this equates to more than 10 million women and men.
  • 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men have been victims of [some form of] physical violence by an intimate partner within their lifetime.
  • 1 in 5 women and 1 in 7 men have been victims of severe physical violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime.
  • 1 in 5 women and 1 in 71 men in the United States have been raped in their lifetime.
  • On a typical day, 20,000+ phone calls are placed to domestic violence hotlines nationwide.
  • Intimate partner violence accounts for 15% of all violent crime.
  • Women between the ages of 18-24 are most commonly abused by an intimate partner.
  • Domestic victimization is correlated with a higher rate of depression and suicidal behavior.
  • Victims of domestic violence are also at higher risk for developing addictions to alcohol tobacco, or drugs.
  • Victims of intimate partner violence lose a total of 8.0 million days of paid work each year.
  • The cost of intimate partner violence exceeds $8.3 billion per year.

Images, top to bottom: Woman Banned; Nancy Hulse

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Artists of Excellence ~ What Wood You Make?

Tuesday, March 29, 2016 to Wednesday, June 15, 2016
The Foyer of the Mindy Ross Gallery, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

Andy Komonchak, artistThe Artists of Excellence series continues at SUNY Orange’s Kaplan Hall by highlighting Bloomingburg resident and versatile artist Andy Komonchak.  His exhibit titled What Wood You Make? showcases his handcrafted wooden bowls and beautiful utilitarian items.  From March 29 through June 15, 2016, the show can be viewed in the glass vitrine cases in the Foyer of the Mindy Ross Gallery.  The space features abundant lighting and affords viewers the opportunity of observing three-dimensional artwork from multiple angles.

Birch Cup by Andy KomonchakKomonchak states, “I really enjoy the ability to go out into my woods and find a log that I cut to put on the lathe and turn into something beautiful and utilitarian. Oftentimes, the uglier and scruffier the original, the more beautiful and interesting is the final result.”  In addition to being a wood turner, he has been a furniture builder, a watercolorist, and a pen and ink artist. He also enjoys making garden sculpture.

On the opening day of his exhibit, Tuesday, March 29, 2016 at 7pm, Andy Komonchak will demonstrate on a small lathe and take ongoing Q & A.  The presentation, The Joy of Wood-turning, will be held in the Orange County Trust Company Great Room 101 that opens to the Foyer where his artwork is on display.  The exhibit and demonstration are free and open to the public.

Orange County has been Komonchak’s home for 28 years and during that time, he has made his mark.  His commercial arts firm which he brought from Denver, ARK Graphics, Inc. Marketing and Design Business, has been successful and well-respected. He was a Founding Board Member of the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, Inc. and presently, serves as its executive director. In 2010, he received Orange County’s Pinnacle of Leadership Award.  In 2014, he received from the Orange County Citizens Foundation the Ottaway Award.  In 2016, he was honored with the Tuskegee Airmen Leadership Mentor Award. In addition, he was a founding member of the Orange County Arts Council and served on the committees of the Orange County Citizens Foundation Marketing Committee, the STEWMAC – 105th Air Wing – Stewart Military Affairs Committee, the Hudson Valley Honor Flight Board, and is currently the Board Chair of Rolling Thunder New York Chapter 3.

Bowl and Bracelet by Andy KomonchakHe attended SUNY Cortland and SUNY Farmingdale, and received a degree in Commercial Art and Design.

The exhibit is presented for viewing during regular college hours Monday through Thursday 8am - 8pm and Friday 8am - 5pm.  The foyer is also open on Sunday, April 10 from 2:30 - 5pm, on Mondays, April 4 and 18 until 8:30pm and April 11 until 9pm, and on Saturday, April 30 from 4 - 7pm for Newburgh Last Saturdays #NBLS. The college is closed on Fridays in June.

Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh, NY.  Free and secure parking is available in the Kaplan Hall garage at 73 First Street.

Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891/9386 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Andy Komonchak, artist; Birch Cup by Andy Komonchak; Bowl and Bracelet by Andy Komonchak

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Are LGBTs the worst Homophobes of all?

Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 11am
Gilman Center, Library Room 130 (MDTN)

American journalist and prominent gay writer Michael Musto is coming to SUNY Orange to discuss through interview and conversation the topic “Are LGBTs the worst Homophobes of all?” This sure-to-be lively discourse will take place in the Gilman Center for International Education, Library room 130, starting at 11am on Thursday, March 31, 2016. During this session he will touch upon related topics concerning the general acceptance or tolerance of Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgenders now and in the long term future.

Michael Musto, American journalist and prominent gay writer, photo by Andrew WernerThis event is free and open to the public and presented in collaboration with GSA (Gay-Straight Alliance) and CIDE (Committee for Institutional Diversity and Equity), both of SUNY Orange.

For 29 years, Musto wrote the lively and opinionated column “La Dolce Musto” at The Village Voice, and is now an entertainment correspondent.  Presently, he writes “Musto! The Musical!” the weekly entertainment-related column on Out.com and “Michael Musto”s Icons,” a celebrity interview column for Advocate magazine. In addition, he writes profiles, trend pieces, and think pieces for the New York Times “Styles” section, Paper magazine, New York magazine, and other publications and sites. He is a regular guest panelist on Logo TV's movie show, “Cocktails and Classics.” As a TV commentator about popular culture, he has appeared on CNN, Theater Talk on Channel 13, MSNBC, and VH1. Musto has also authored four books: the non-fiction guide “Downtown,” the novel “Manhattan on the Rocks,” and two collections—“La Dolce Musto” and “Fork on the Left, Knife in the Back.” Along the way, he has been a theater producer and actor. He holds a B.A. degree in English Literature from Columbia College at Columbia University.

The Gilman Center is located in SUNY Orange’s Library, situated at the corner of South Street and East Conkling Avenue (near GPS 115 South Street), Middletown. Free parking is available in the college’s parking lots and on street.

Questions may be directed to (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Image (by Andrew Werner): Michael Musto, American journalist and prominent gay writer

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Contact Us:
Dorothy Szefc
Coordinator of Cultural Affairs
(845) 341-4891
cultural@sunyorange.edu

All Cultural Affairs Events are open to the public and all buildings are universally accessible.

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